Vivaldis

David Pereira discusses his development as a student, from being spoon-fed to finding his own way.

DAVID PEREIRA: When I started out, I knew – or felt that I knew – nothing about playing the cello, and I was a willing recipient of teaching and I would try to do what my teacher said. Over time I developed some of my own opinions and sometimes I would keep it to myself if I disagreed with my teacher, and then, eventually, I felt that I did not want to be anybody’s student, overtly, any more.

So, I think there is an actual way of evolution for musicians as their skill, their competency and their experience grow and they quite naturally become more their own player; and less likely to want, shall we say, interference from others. And I can see that in my own way of changing in my playing.

It’s nice, this process, because at every stage there are things to enjoy. When you are relatively helpless and being spoon-fed it is quite pleasant too and then later when you go, ‘I’ve got to find the way of playing that I really like, and I have to put aside advice I’ve been receiving to find that’, that also is exciting and pleasant.

INTERVIEWER: I mean, all the choices you make as an artist, it’s a…

PEREIRA: Part of growing up.

INTERVIEWER: It’s a daunting, daunting prospect isn’t it?

PEREIRA: Yes.


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